Better Safe Than Sorry

Once a week I try and help out in my son’s prep classroom as a parent helper. I do this for two reasons: my son looks forward to my involvement in his classroom and it is my way of keeping a pulse on what he is learning in the classroom, so that I can further help him at home if need be. I enjoy these sessions because it impresses me to see how far he has come in the area of classroom behaviour, reading, best website content writer and doing maths. My son’s class has several boisterous boys. At the beginning of the year, it was difficult for some of them to adjust to classroom expectations and routine.

However, their no nonsense old school teacher has since trained them well because they can sit and listen for long periods now (e.g. at assembly or some presentation) and work quietly most times. Most of the time when I am there, the children are working in groups doing writing, reading or making something connected with the letter of the week or an animal they are reporting on and looking for a professional resumes for senior management. On one occasion, all the prep students were invited to a Year 4 concert in the hall, so we spent the morning there instead of doing work in class. On another occasion, some firefighters came to the school to talk to the prep students about fire safety. I happened to be on parent helper duty that day, so was able to sit in on the fire protection presentation.

Three firefighters were present at the fire protection presentation. They showed pictures and talked about safe fires versus unsafe fires (i.e. adult supervision around naked fires such as stove, camp fires, BBQ; camp fires should be contained within a border to prevent embers from flying out; flammable items to be kept away from naked flames and heaters). Next they talked about the importance of having fire safety equipment that are in working order in all homes such as smoke alarms and fire extinguishers, and having an evacuation plan and designated assembly point that everyone in the household knows about in case of a fire. Then they taught the students how to “stop, drop, cover (the face) and roll” if their clothes catch on fire. They also taught the students to “crawl low (because that is where the cleanest air is) and go, go, go” to get out of the house in case of a fire. Finally, one firefighter put on his fire protection gear known as personal protective equipment which included a fire resistant tunic, protective hood, firefighting boots, firefighting helmet, thermal resistant gloves, breathing apparatus and overtrousers that are worn over their regular uniform.

I was pleased that the school had organised this fire protection presentation for the prep students. I think using real life firefighters to demonstrate fire safety was more effective than simply covering the topic in class.

Category: Education & Learning

- October 25, 2016